Studio, Berlin, Winter, 2020.



@Studio, Berlin 2020 Winter. https://www.facebook.com/HANJAEYEOL



The face and the mask - Giorgio Agamben





What you call face cannot exist in any animal if not in man, and expresses character. - Cicero


All living beings are in the open, they show and communicate to each other, but only man has a face, only man makes his appearance and his communicating to other men their fundamental experience, only man makes face the place of their own truth.

What the face exposes and reveals is not something that can be said in words, formulated in this or that meaningful proposition. In his own face, man unknowingly puts himself at play, it is in his face, before in his word, that he expresses himself and reveals himself. And what the face expresses is not just the mood of an individual, it is first and foremost its openness, its exposing itself and communicating to other men.

For this reason the face is the place of politics. If there is no animal policy, this is only because the animals, which are already in the open, do not make their exposure a problem, they simply dwell in it without caring for it. This is why they don't care about mirrors, about the image as an image. Man, on the other hand, wants to recognize himself and be recognized, wants to take his own image, seek his own truth in it. In this way he transforms the open into a world, in the field of incessant political dialectic.

If men had to share information, always this or that thing, there would never really be politics, but only message exchange. But since men have first and foremost their openness, that is pure communicability, the face is the very condition of politics, in which everything men say and exchange is founded. The face is in this sense the real city of men, the political element par excellence. It is by looking in the face that men recognize each other and are passionate about each other, they perceive resemblance and diversity, distance and proximity.

A country that decides to give up its face, to cover with masks in every place the faces of its citizens is, then, a country that has erased every political dimension. In this empty space, subjected to limitless control at every moment, individuals isolated from each other are now moving, who have lost the immediate and sensitive foundation of their community and can only exchange direct messages to a faceless name. To a faceless name.




Alle Lebewesen bewegen sich in einem Raum, den wir Öffentlichkeit nennen, sie offenbaren sich und sie kommunizieren miteinander, aber nur der Mensch hat ein Gesicht, nur der Mensch macht sein Erscheinen und seine Kommunikation mit anderen Menschen zu seiner eigenen Grunderfahrung, nur der Mensch macht sein Gesicht zum Ort seiner eigenen Wahrheit.

Was das Gesicht offenbart und enthüllt, lässt sich nicht in Worte fassen, in diesem oder jenem bedeutsamen Satz formulieren. In seinem eigenen Gesicht setzt sich der Mensch unbewusst selbst aufs Spiel, im Gesicht, vor dem Wort, drückt er sich aus und offenbart sich. Und was das Gesicht zum Ausdruck bringt, ist nicht nur der Gemütszustand eines Individuums, sondern vor allem seine Offenheit, seine Blöße und seine Verständigung mit anderen Menschen.

Deshalb ist das Gesicht der Ort der Politik. Wenn es keine Politik für Tiere gibt, dann nur deshalb, weil die Tiere, die sich immer in einer “Öffentlichkeit” aufhalten, ihre Exposition nicht zu einem Problem machen, sie verweilen einfach darin, ohne sich darum zu kümmern. Deshalb interessieren sie sich nicht für Spiegel, für das Bild als Abbild. Der Mensch aber will vielmehr sich selbst erkennen und erkannt werden, er will sich sein eigenes Bild aneignen, er sucht darin seine eigene Wahrheit. Auf diese Weise transformiert er das Offene in die eine Welt, in das Reich einer fortwährenden politischen Dialektik.

Wenn Menschen immer und ausschließlich nur Informationen hätten, die sie einander mitteilen könnten, immer nur dieses oder jenes, dann gäbe es nie eine wirkliche Politik, sondern nur einen Austausch von Botschaften. Aber da die Menschen einander zunächst einmal ihre Bereitschaft zur Offenheit, d.h. ihre pure Mitteilungsfähigkeit, vermitteln müssen, ist das Gesicht die eigentliche Bedingung der Politik, diejenige, in der alles, was die Menschen sagen und der wahre Austausch begründet ist. Das Gesicht ist in diesem Sinne die wahre Stadt der Menschen, das politische Element schlechthin. Durch den Blick auf das Gesicht erkennen die Menschen einander und sind füreinander geradezu leidenschaftlich, sie nehmen Ähnlichkeit und Vielfalt, Distanz und Nähe wahr.

Ein Land, das beschließt, sein eigenes Gesicht aufzugeben, um überall die Gesichter seiner Bürger mit Masken zu bedecken, ist also ein Land, das alle politischen Dimensionen aus sich selbst ausgelöscht hat. In diesem leeren Raum, der jederzeit grenzenloser Kontrolle unterworfen ist, bewegen sich nun voneinander isolierte Individuen, die das unmittelbare und sensible Fundament ihrer Gemeinschaft verloren haben und nur noch Botschaften austauschen können, die an einen gesichtslosen Namen gerichtet sind. An einen gesichtslosen Menschen.

Deshalb ist das Gesicht der Ort der Politik. Wenn es keine Politik für Tiere gibt, dann nur deshalb, weil die Tiere, die sich immer in einer “Öffentlichkeit” aufhalten, ihre Exposition nicht zu einem Problem machen, sie verweilen einfach darin, ohne sich darum zu kümmern. Deshalb interessieren sie sich nicht für Spiegel, für das Bild als Abbild. Der Mensch aber will vielmehr sich selbst erkennen und erkannt werden, er will sich sein eigenes Bild aneignen, er sucht darin seine eigene Wahrheit. Auf diese Weise transformiert er das Offene in die eine Welt, in das Reich einer fortwährenden politischen Dialektik.

Wenn Menschen immer und ausschließlich nur Informationen hätten, die sie einander mitteilen könnten, immer nur dieses oder jenes, dann gäbe es nie eine wirkliche Politik, sondern nur einen Austausch von Botschaften. Aber da die Menschen einander zunächst einmal ihre Bereitschaft zur Offenheit, d.h. ihre pure Mitteilungsfähigkeit, vermitteln müssen, ist das Gesicht die eigentliche Bedingung der Politik, diejenige, in der alles, was die Menschen sagen und der wahre Austausch begründet ist. Das Gesicht ist in diesem Sinne die wahre Stadt der Menschen, das politische Element schlechthin. Durch den Blick auf das Gesicht erkennen die Menschen einander und sind füreinander geradezu leidenschaftlich, sie nehmen Ähnlichkeit und Vielfalt, Distanz und Nähe wahr.

Ein Land, das beschließt, sein eigenes Gesicht aufzugeben, um überall die Gesichter seiner Bürger mit Masken zu bedecken, ist also ein Land, das alle politischen Dimensionen aus sich selbst ausgelöscht hat. In diesem leeren Raum, der jederzeit grenzenloser Kontrolle unterworfen ist, bewegen sich nun voneinander isolierte Individuen, die das unmittelbare und sensible Fundament ihrer Gemeinschaft verloren haben und nur noch Botschaften austauschen können, die an einen gesichtslosen Namen gerichtet sind. An einen gesichtslosen Menschen.

Giorgio Agamben, October 8, 2020. / https://www.quodlibet.it/giorgio-agamben-un-paese-senza-volto




Passersby, Unmask, October — Project Passersby / 90.9x72.7cm, Oil on Canvas, 2016, South Korea



‘the mask was understood as a copy of the face … as a substitute for that face’






The history of the human face begins in the Neolithic period with masks that represented or replicated faces. Masks are evidence of the oldest human concept of the face.


The same Neolithic site complex also contains evidence of a second practice in the cult of the dead. This consists of real skulls covered with a thin layer of fired lime and clay fused together; the empty eye sockets are filled with seashells. In this case the mask does not lie upon the face, but rather it is the face, for it is modeled directly onto the skull, to which it has restored the face that it once wore. In other words, in place of its living face, the skull has received a new, permanent one, which may then be understood as an image. In some cases, the skulls were mounted on small structures such as pedestals. This produced a composite entity consisting of skull(corpse) and image. 

Hans Belting, Face and Mask (p.32-36)



Study of Death mask — Project Passersby / 30x24.5cm, Pigment Bar on Linen 2020, Berlin


Building Atlas



Front page / jaeyeolhan.com

Aby Warburg, Bilderatlas Mnemosyne, Tafel 39 (recovered). Photo: Wootton / fluid.

“The art of fixing a shadow."



Pliny the Elder’s Natural History tells the story (also echoed by Turner) of the Maid of Corinth, who “was in love with a young man; and she, when he was going abroad, drew in outline on the wall the shadow of his face thrown by the lamp.” This scene, which has been represented often in Western art (fig. 1), expresses both pictures of desire in a single scene; it has its cake and eats it too. The shadow is not itself a living thing, but its likeness and projection of the young man are both metaphoric and metonymic, icon and index. It is thus a ghostly effigy that is “fixed” (as in a photographic process) by the tracing of the outline and (in Pliny’s further elaboration) eventually realized by the maiden’s father in a sculptural relief, presumably after the death of the departed lover. So the image is born of desire, is (we might say) a symptom of desire, a phantasmatic, spectral trace of the desire to hold on to the loved one, to keep some trace of his life during his absence. The “want” or lack in the natural image (the shadow) is its impermanence: when the young man leaves— in fact, when he moves a few feet— his shadow will disappear. Drawing, like photography, is seen to originate in the “art of fixing the shadow.” The silhouette drawing, then, expresses the wish to deny death or departure, to hold on to the loved one, to keep him present and permanently “alive”— as in Bazin’s “mummified image” in the film still.

Of course, this last remark suggests that the picture could equally well be read as the symptom of a wish for the young man’s death, a (disavowed) desire to substitute a dead image for the living being. The picture is as much about “unbinding” the bonds of love, letting the young man depart, disintegrating the imaginary unity of his existence into the separable parts of shadow, trace, and substance. In the world of image magic, the life of the image may depend on the death of the model, and the legends of “stealing the soul” of the sitter by trapping his image in a camera or a manual production would be equally relevant here. We can imagine the young woman coming to prefer her depicted or (even better) sculpted lover as a more pliable and reliable partner, and rejecting the young man should he ever return to Corinth.

Mitchell, W. J. T.. What Do Pictures Want? (pp. 67-68). University of Chicago Press. Kindle Edition.


1. Anne-Louis Girodet-Trioson, The Origin of Drawing, engraving from Oeuvres posthumes, 1819. Photograph courtesy of The University of Chicago Library.


2. Passersby, Covertness_Oil bar on Linen_34x22cm_2013